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A year and more gone by..no posts March 23, 2015

Posted by msrviking in Configuration, Data Integration, Design, Integration, MySQL, Oracle, Performance tuning.
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I alone know on how I have missed blogging on what all I learnt on MySQL and Oracle RDS over last 14 months, and how much I wished that what all I did was on SQL Server. Well, not always it is the way you want it to be.

There was such a learning over this period on the way things are done in MySQL, Oracle at design, development and performance engineering that I might have to spend several days blogging about. In next few weeks to months I will be spending time on variety of learnings starting from design, coding, through performance tuning to achieve concurrency and scalability. Although these topics will primarily be around MySQL, Oracle I might map on some of the done work to SQL Server features and implementations.

A brief preview on what would be the topics on, and possibly will be having its own sub-series in detail with mapping

MySQL:

  1. What are the physical design checklist
  2. What are best instance level configurations
  3. What are the optimal working configuration values of host hardware and OS
  4. What are the ways to optimize execution plans
  5. What are the coding best practices
  6. What are the ways to troubleshoot deadlocking problems

Oracle RDS:

  1. What are the best practices for coding in PL/SQL
  2. What are the best practices for designing and building integration DB
  3. What are the ways to optimize execution plans
  4. What are the ways to monitor for any performance bottlenecks
  5. What are the ways to achieve concurrency, scalability and performance
  6. What is that not do-able when compared to on-premise instances
  7. How to administer the instance

Happy reading.

Data type and conversions December 7, 2012

Posted by msrviking in DBA Rant, Performance tuning, T-SQL.
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Today I downloaded SQL Server Data Type Conversion Chart from this location. I remember this chart very well and its available on BOL that would have been installed on your system or on MSDN online.

As soon as I saw the chart, it reminded me days where I used to explain to the development on its importance and always push the developers, leads to have a look on this topic in BOL. Today I am going to tell the teams whoever use SQL Server to download this and stick it around as long as they are on development side of database.

One of the points that I leave with the teams is

“Make sure you don’t have variables declared in your code that cannot match the data types that are designed in the tables. This would mean implicit conversions by query engine and when this happens it could lead to performance problems, deadlocks.”

There had been several situations where performance reviews and fixes ended by just change of variables data types in the T-SQL code. I don’t think I am going to stop sharing this point anytime, anywhere to developers forum whatsoever. There are experienced folks who do this mistake even today, and one can’t get rid of basic mistakes unless its part of practice. Practice has to be diligent, and has to be cultivated.

So if you see anyone writing a piece of code that could hit your performance benchmarks badly, please don’t hesitate to give this piece of advice again.

Let me know what you think.

Cheers and Enjoy!